ATHLETIC FLOOR - FLOOR


Athletic floor - Carpet vs wood floors



Athletic Floor





athletic floor






    athletic
  • Physically strong, fit, and active

  • Of or relating to athletes or athletics

  • relating to or befitting athletics or athletes; "athletic facilities"

  • having a sturdy and well proportioned body; "an athletic build"

  • acrobatic: vigorously active; "an acrobatic dance"; "an athletic child"; "athletic playing"; "gymnastic exercises"





    floor
  • The lower surface of a room, on which one may walk

  • All the rooms or areas on the same level of a building; a story

  • A level area or space used or designed for a particular activity

  • a structure consisting of a room or set of rooms at a single position along a vertical scale; "what level is the office on?"

  • shock: surprise greatly; knock someone's socks off; "I was floored when I heard that I was promoted"

  • the inside lower horizontal surface (as of a room, hallway, tent, or other structure); "they needed rugs to cover the bare floors"; "we spread our sleeping bags on the dry floor of the tent"











athletic floor - 1929 Ad




1929 Ad CELLized Oak Wood Flooring Home Improvement Dallas Athletic Club Floors - Original Print Ad


1929 Ad CELLized Oak Wood Flooring Home Improvement Dallas Athletic Club Floors - Original Print Ad



This is an original 1929 color print ad for CELLized oak floor blocks by CELLized Oak Flooring Inc., located in Memphis, Tennessee. This as has pictures of the ballroom in the Dallas Athletic Club, a display room of John T. Fisher Motor Company in Memphis and an office building in Chicago. CELLized oak floor blocks are manufactured by: Tennessee Oak Flooring Company, Nashville; Nashville Hardware Flooring Company, Nasville; Bradley Lumber Company of Arkansas, Warren, Arkansas; E. L. Bruce Company, Memphis; The Long-Bell Lumber Company, Kansas City, Missouri; Arkansas Oak Flooring Company, Pine Bluff, Arkansas.










82% (6)





Downtown Athletic Club Building




Downtown Athletic Club Building





Financial District, Manhattan

This 35-story, Art Deco skyscraper opened in 1930 as the Downtown Athletic Club. A membership association geared toward businessmen and lawyers who worked in lower Manhattan, the Downtown Athletic Club was founded in 1926. By 1927 it had purchased this site next to the Hudson River to construct its own building. The high cost of land necessitated a tall building, and the relatively small lot size dictated that the different functions and facilities of the club, including swimming pool, gymnasium, miniature golf course, squash, and tennis courts, as well as dining rooms and living quarters, be accommodated on separate floors.

The Downtown Athletic Club became most famous as the home of the Heisman Trophy, given every year to the most outstanding college football player, and named after John Heisman, the club’s first athletic director. The prolific architectural firm of Starrett & Van Vleck designed the building. The same firm created the neighboring tower at 21 West Street (a designated New York City Landmark), with which the Club shares its modernistic style and skillfully applied brickwork. The boxy shape and variety of setbacks in the Downtown Athletic Club Building demonstrate the effects of the 1916 Building Zone Resolution, but also give some indication of the various purposes assigned to different sections of the building.

The architects juxtaposed the simple massing of the building with stylized, theater-like entrance prosceniums on both facades and a dextrous use of flat and angled brick, creating a dramatic addition to the city’s skyline. The powerful chevron motifs in the rectangular areas over the entrances and in the spandrels between the windows of the upper stories are a variation of a common design theme of the period, reflective of the speed and energy of the Jazz Age.

The Downtown Athletic Club building, like its neighbor at 21 West Street, was a product of Starrett & Van Vleck's modernistic, Art Deco period.

Designed shortly before 21 West Street, the architects clearly considered the effect of these two towers on each other as well as on the skyline of lower Manhattan. Both buildings extend through the block from West to Washington Streets, although the athletic club sits back farther from both street lines creating limited southern exposures for the office building next door. The brick colors are not the same but complement each other as do the setback heights, and the juxtaposition of the less complicated design of the Downtown Athletic Club Building with the greater variety of angles and lines at the 21 West Street Building creates a dynamic statement of the modernist aesthetic.

At 35 stories, the Athletic Club is the tallest structure on the blockfront, and its height is emphasized by the continuous piers formed between the vertically-grouped windows and by the series of setbacks creating taller and narrower building sections.

The variety of functions in the building is reflected in the different blocks created by the setbacks. The four lowest stories are closest to the lot line, with broad doorways and awnings providing a welcome. On the interior at this level public reception rooms and club offices were located, with game and billiard rooms at the third story. Immediately above this, the building sets back to form its largest block, which houses most of the athletic facilities: floors four through the twelfth mezzanine originally had handball and squash courts, a bowling alley, a miniature golf course, a gym, a pool, various locker and dressing rooms, and related mechanical equipment. Some floors, such as those with the squash courts, have no windows. The windows that exist on other floors are slightly inset, with dark, decorative metal spandrels creating a vertical link and continuous brick piers between them.

On the thirteenth through the fifteenth stories the grill, the kitchens and the main dining room were placed, and a greenhouse was constructed over the outdoor balcony at the fifteenth story. Although the building sets back above this, floors 16 through 19 housed mechanical equipment, lounges and private dining rooms. On floors 20 through 35, there were individual hotel-type bedrooms, indicated by smaller, evenly spaced windows on the facade. A service stairway is in the northeast corner of the building and the top three floors have mechanical equipment and the water tank.

The idea of an athletic club in a skyscraper, with different functions on each floor, has been called “the apotheosis of the Skyscraper as instrument of the Culture of Congestion.”18 This building was called the ultimate machine for living, encouraging desirable forms of human intercourse and the pursuit of bodily perfection.

The building is faced in mottled orange brick which serves as a foil for the varied colors and designs of its neighbor to the north. The fine brickwork, seen in the corbelling around the entrances, the window recesses, and the open wo











Downtown Athletic Club Building




Downtown Athletic Club Building





Financial District, Downtown Manhattan, New York City, United States of America

Financial District, Manhattan

This 35-story, Art Deco skyscraper opened in 1930 as the Downtown Athletic Club. A membership association geared toward businessmen and lawyers who worked in lower Manhattan, the Downtown Athletic Club was founded in 1926. By 1927 it had purchased this site next to the Hudson River to construct its own building. The high cost of land necessitated a tall building, and the relatively small lot size dictated that the different functions and facilities of the club, including swimming pool, gymnasium, miniature golf course, squash, and tennis courts, as well as dining rooms and living quarters, be accommodated on separate floors.

The Downtown Athletic Club became most famous as the home of the Heisman Trophy, given every year to the most outstanding college football player, and named after John Heisman, the club’s first athletic director. The prolific architectural firm of Starrett & Van Vleck designed the building. The same firm created the neighboring tower at 21 West Street (a designated New York City Landmark), with which the Club shares its modernistic style and skillfully applied brickwork. The boxy shape and variety of setbacks in the Downtown Athletic Club Building demonstrate the effects of the 1916 Building Zone Resolution, but also give some indication of the various purposes assigned to different sections of the building.

The architects juxtaposed the simple massing of the building with stylized, theater-like entrance prosceniums on both facades and a dextrous use of flat and angled brick, creating a dramatic addition to the city’s skyline. The powerful chevron motifs in the rectangular areas over the entrances and in the spandrels between the windows of the upper stories are a variation of a common design theme of the period, reflective of the speed and energy of the Jazz Age.

The Downtown Athletic Club building, like its neighbor at 21 West Street, was a product of Starrett & Van Vleck's modernistic, Art Deco period.

Designed shortly before 21 West Street, the architects clearly considered the effect of these two towers on each other as well as on the skyline of lower Manhattan. Both buildings extend through the block from West to Washington Streets, although the athletic club sits back farther from both street lines creating limited southern exposures for the office building next door. The brick colors are not the same but complement each other as do the setback heights, and the juxtaposition of the less complicated design of the Downtown Athletic Club Building with the greater variety of angles and lines at the 21 West Street Building creates a dynamic statement of the modernist aesthetic.

At 35 stories, the Athletic Club is the tallest structure on the blockfront, and its height is emphasized by the continuous piers formed between the vertically-grouped windows and by the series of setbacks creating taller and narrower building sections.

The variety of functions in the building is reflected in the different blocks created by the setbacks. The four lowest stories are closest to the lot line, with broad doorways and awnings providing a welcome. On the interior at this level public reception rooms and club offices were located, with game and billiard rooms at the third story. Immediately above this, the building sets back to form its largest block, which houses most of the athletic facilities: floors four through the twelfth mezzanine originally had handball and squash courts, a bowling alley, a miniature golf course, a gym, a pool, various locker and dressing rooms, and related mechanical equipment. Some floors, such as those with the squash courts, have no windows. The windows that exist on other floors are slightly inset, with dark, decorative metal spandrels creating a vertical link and continuous brick piers between them.

On the thirteenth through the fifteenth stories the grill, the kitchens and the main dining room were placed, and a greenhouse was constructed over the outdoor balcony at the fifteenth story. Although the building sets back above this, floors 16 through 19 housed mechanical equipment, lounges and private dining rooms. On floors 20 through 35, there were individual hotel-type bedrooms, indicated by smaller, evenly spaced windows on the facade. A service stairway is in the northeast corner of the building and the top three floors have mechanical equipment and the water tank.

The idea of an athletic club in a skyscraper, with different functions on each floor, has been called “the apotheosis of the Skyscraper as instrument of the Culture of Congestion.”18 This building was called the ultimate machine for living, encouraging desirable forms of human intercourse and the pursuit of bodily perfection.

The building is faced in mottled orange brick which serves as a foil for the varied colors and designs of its neighbor to the north. The fine brickwork,









athletic floor







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